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Statistics on the Holocaust 

It is estimated that 2 million were killed by the Einsatzgruppen,*  3.3 million in the gas chambers,** and about 500,000 died in the ghettos of Eastern Europe of hunger, disease, and exhaustion, and as victims of random terror and reprisals.  See Lucy S. Davidowicz, The Holocaust and the Historian (1981), pp. 12-13.

*Einsatzgruppen, special duty troops of the SS’s security service and security police, were assigned to each of the German armies invading the Soviet Union.  They rounded up the Jews and killed them.  The Jews were loaded on trucks or marched to remote areas.  They were machine gunned into natural ravines, antitank trenches or the mass graves they were ordered to dig.

**Later, starting in 1942, the Nazis contructed six installations with large scale gassing facilities and with crematoria for the disposal of bodies.  They were Auschwitz, Belzec, Chelmno, Majdanek, Sobibor, and Treblinka.  All were located in Poland.  Gilbert notes that 1,500,000 Jews were murdered at Auschwitz; 360,000 at Chelmno; 250,000 at Sobibor; 600,000 at Belzec; and 840,000 at Treblinka.  See Martin Gilbert, The Holocaust (1985), p. 257, n. 6.

Jewish Victims of the Holocaust[1]

Polish-Soviet area

4,565,000

Germany

   125,000

Austria

     65.000

Czechoslovakia (in the pre-Munich boundaries

  277,000

Hungary, including northern Transylvania

   402,000

France

     83,000

Belgium

     24,000

Luxembourg

          700

Italy

        7,500

The Netherlands

    106,000

Norway

           760

Romania (Regat, southern Transylvania, southern Bukovina)

       40,000

Yugoslavia

       60,000

Greece

       65,000

     Total Loss

  5,820,960

 

 

Germany’s Jews in Modern Times[2]

Year

Population

1871

512,158

1880

562,612

1890

567,884

1900

586,833

1910

615,021

1925

564,379

1933

503,000

1939

234,000

1941

164,000

1969

 30,000

Jewish Emigration from Germany, 1933 – 1939[3]

Between April 1933 and May 1939, 304,500 Jews emigrated from Germany (including areas occupied by Germany in May 1939).  They emigrated to:

U.S.

  63,000

Palestine

  55,000

Great Britain

  40,000

France

  30,000

Argentina

  25,000

Brazil

  13,000

South Africa 

    5,500

Italy

    5,000

Other European countries

  25,000

Other South American countries

  15,000

Other

    8,000

     Total

 304,500

World Jewish Population, 1939[4] and 1989[5]

 

Total World Population 2,296,000,000 in 1939

Total World Population 5,318,000,000 in 1989

Total World Jewish Population 16,648,000 in 1939

Total World Jewish Population 13,276,300 in 1989

 

Place

Number 1939

Number 1989

% of World Jewry 1939

% of World Jewry 1989

Europe

9,462,000

2,558,400

56.8

19.3

Americas

5,556,000

6,727,700

33.4

50.7

Asia

1,008,000

3,750,700

  6.1

28.3

Africa

   594,000

   149,000

  3.6

  1.1

Australia & New Zealand

 

     28,000

 

     89,600

 

   0.1

 

   0.7


[1] Judah Gribetz with Edward L. Greenstein and Regina S. Stein, The Timetables of Jewish History:  A Chronology of the Most Important People and Events in Jewish History. (New York:  A Touchstone Book, Simon and Schuster, 1993.) p. 479

[2] Gribetz, Timetables, p. 385

[3] Gribetz, Timetables, p. 400

[4] Gribetz, Timetables, p. 426

[5] Gribetz, Timetables, p. 709

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prepared March 1, 2001